Town of Deerfield, NH
8 Raymond Road, Deerfield, NH 03037-0159
ph: (603) 463-8811
fx: (603) 463-2820
Town Clerk Lineage
 Deerfield Town Clerk Lineage
Year
Combined Position Town Clerk/Tax Collector
Town Clerk
2017
Kevin J. Barry
2016
Kevin J. Barry

Deerfield celebrates its 250th birthday!
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2015
Kevin J. Barry
2014
Kevin J. Barry
2013
Kevin J. Barry
2012
Kevin J. Barry

Almost a century after women obtained the vote, New Hampshire became the first state ever to be represented by an all-female Congressional delegation

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2011
Kevin J. Barry
2010
Kevin J. Barry
2009
Kevin J. Barry
2008
Kevin J. Barry

Tornado rips through Deerfield on July 24, 2008
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2007
R. Lynne DeVarney
2006
R. Lynne DeVarney
New England Flood of 2006 AKA the "Mother's Day Flood"
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2005
Diana J. Vincent
Melissa J. Buckner
2004
Melissa Buckner
Cynthia E. Heon

Facebook is created
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2003
Cynthia E. Heon

NH iconic landmark The Old Man of the Mountain Falls
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2002
Cynthia E. Heon
2001
Cynthia E. Heon

Two hijacked jetliners ram twin towers of World Trade Center in worst terrorist attack against U.S.; a third hijacked plane flies into the Pentagon, and a fourth crashes in rural Pennsylvania. More than 3,000 people die in the attacks (Sept. 11).
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2000
Cynthia E. Heon
1999
Cynthia E. Heon
1998
Cynthia E. Heon
1997
Cynthia E. Heon
1996
Cynthia E. Heon

Jeanne Shaheen became the first woman to be elected governor of New Hampshire and only the fourth person to serve in that office three consecutive terms

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1995
Cynthia E. Heon

Senate Bill 2 passed, authorizing, as an alternative to the traditional annual town meeting, a deliberative session followed in about a month by voting at the polls

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1994
Cynthia E. Heon
1993
Cynthia E. Heon
1992
Cynthia E. Heon
1991
Cynthia E. Heon
1990
Cynthia E. Heon

The New Hampshire International Speedway opened in Loudon in 1990, it was the largest sports facility in New England, drawing 500,000 spectators annually

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1989
Cynthia E. Heon
1988
Cynthia E. Heon
1987
Ruth S. Sanborn
1986
Ruth S. Sanborn


Space shuttle Challenger explodes 73 seconds after liftoff, killing all seven crew members (Jan. 28).  It is the worst accident  in the history of the U.S. space program.
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1985
Ruth S. Sanborn
1984
Ruth S. Sanborn
1983
Ruth S. Sanborn
1982
Ruth S. Sanborn
1981
Ruth S. Sanborn


Sandra Day O'Connor is sworn in as the first woman Supreme Court justice (Sept. 25).
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1980
Ruth S. Sanborn
1979
Ruth S. Sanborn


Malfunction at Three Mile Island nuclear reactor in Pennsylvania causes near meltdown (March 28)
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1978
Ruth S. Sanborn
1977
Ruth S. Sanborn
1976
Ruth S. Sanborn
1975
Ruth S. Sanborn
1974
Ruth S. Sanborn
1973
Ruth S. Sanborn
1972
Ruth S. Sanborn
1971
Ruth S. Sanborn
1970
Ruth S. Sanborn
1969
Ruth S. Sanborn

Over 500,000 people attended Woodstock
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1968
Ruth S. Sanborn


Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., is assassinated in Memphis, Tenn. (April 4).  Sen. Robert F. Kennedy is assassinated in Los Angeles, Calif. (June 5–6).
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1967
Ruth S. Sanborn
1966
Ruth S. Sanborn
1965
Ruth S. Sanborn
1964
Ruth S. Sanborn


President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act (July 2).

1963
Ruth S. Sanborn

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivers his “I Have a Dream” speech before a crowd of 200,000 during the civil rights march on Washington, DC (Aug. 28). President Kennedy is assassinated in Dallas, Tex. (Nov. 22). He is succeeded in office by his vice president, Lyndon B. Johnson.
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1962
Ruth S. Sanborn
1961
Ruth S. Sanborn

 According to the nation's "first widely reported UFO abduction" case, Betty and Barney Hill of Portsmouth were abducted by aliens while traveling through Franconia Notch

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Derry native Alan Shepard, one of the original seven astronauts, became the first American in space and the first person of any nation to pilot a vehicle in space

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1960
Ruth S. Sanborn

The first American to win an Olympic downhill skiing medal was 21-year-old Penny Pitou of Gilford, who earned silver medals in both downhill and giant slalom

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1959
Ruth S. Sanborn

Due to a further decline in railroad use with the expansion of the interstate highway system, Concord's 1885 railroad station was demolished for a shopping center

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1958
Albert H. Burtt
1957
Albert H. Burtt
1956
Albert H. Burtt
1955
Charles E. Rand
1954
Preston B. Wares

Latex rubber manufacturer Neil Tillotson, a North Country native, purchased the declining Balsams Hotel in Dixville Notch, saving it for the welfare of the community

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1953
Charles E. Rand

Artist Alice Cosgrove of the N.H. State Planning and Development Commission created the cartoon character “Chippa Granite” to promote the state and its products

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1952
Charles E. Rand
1951
Charles E. Rand
1950
Charles E. Rand
1949
Charles E. Rand
1948
Charles E. Rand
1947
Charles E. Rand
1946
Charles E. Rand
1945
George W. Brown

U.S. drops atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan (Aug. 6)
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1944
George W. Brown
1943
George W. Brown
1942
George W. Brown
1941
George W. Brown
1940
George W. Brown
1939
George W. Brown
1938
George W. Brown
1937
George W. Brown
1936
George W. Brown
1935
George W. Brown
1934
George W. Brown
1933
George W. Brown
1932
George W. Brown

Hattie Wyatt Caraway of Arkansas is the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of her husband (Jan. 12). She is reelected in 1932 and 1938. Amelia Earhart completes first solo nonstop transatlantic flight by a woman (May 21).
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1931
George W. Brown
1930
George W. Brown
1929
George W. Brown
1928
George W. Brown
1927
George W. Brown

CharlesLindbergh makes the first solo nonstop transatlantic flight in his plane The Spirit of St. Louis (May 20–21).
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1926
George W. Brown
1925
George W. Brown
1924
George W. Brown
1923
George W. Brown
1922
Frederick O. Wilson
1921
Frederick O. Wilson
1920
Frederick O. Wilson
1919
Frederick O. Wilson
1918
Frederick O. Wilson

May 16 the White Mountain National Forest is established
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1917
Carroll E. Legro
1916
Frederick O. Wilson


Jeannette Rankin of Montana is the first woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (Nov. 7).
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1915
Frederick O. Wilson
1914
Frederick O. Wilson

The first tract of land for the White Mountain National Forest (in Benton) was acquired from E. Bertram Pike of Haverhill, as a result of the 1911 Weeks Act

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1913
Frederick O. Wilson
1912
Frederick O. Wilson
1911
Frederick O. Wilson
1910
Frederick O. Wilson
1909
Frederick O. Wilson

Photographer Lewis Hine, working for the National Child Labor Committee, documented child labor conditions in several New Hampshire mill towns
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1908
Frederick O. Wilson
1907
Charles R. Brown

Marian MacDowell welcomed the first colonists to the Peterborough art colony, named in honor of her husband, noted composer Edward MacDowell

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1906
Edmund Chase
1905
George H. Robinson
1904
George H. Robinson
1903
George H. Robinson

U.S. acquires Panama Canal Zone (treaty signed Nov. 17). Wright brothers make the first controlled, sustained flight in heavier-than-air aircraft at Kitty Hawk, N.C. (Dec. 17).
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1902
Edmund T. Chase
1901
Edmund T. Chase
1900
Edmund T. Chase
1899
Edmund T. Chase

Governor Frank West Rollins proclaimed the first Old Home Week, hoping to strengthen emotional and economic ties of former residents to their birthplace

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1898
Edmund T. Chase
1897
Charles R. Brown
1896
Charles R. Brown
1895
O.J. Chase
1894
O.J. Chase
1893
O.J. Chase
1892
O.J. Chase
1891
O.J. Chase

The Ferris Wheel was invented
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1890
O.J. Chase
A.B. Chase
1889
A.B. Chase
1888
Edmund T. Chase
1887
Edmund T. Chase
1886
George B. Hoitt

Statue ofLiberty is dedicated (Oct. 28). American Federation of Labor is organized (Dec.).
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1885
George B. Hoitt
1884
George B. Hoitt
1883
George B. Hoitt
James Prescott
1882
James Prescott
1881
James Prescott
1880
James Prescott
1879
James Prescott
Charles E.P. Hoitt
1878
Charles E.P. Hoitt
1877
James Prescott

The Phonograph is invented
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1876
James Prescott

Lt. Col.George A. Custer's regiment is wiped out by Sioux Indians under Sitting Bull at the Little Big Horn River, Mont. (June 25).
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1875
James Prescott
1874
James Prescott
1873
James Prescott
1872
James Prescott
1871
James Prescott

P.T. Barnum established traveling circus

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1870
James Prescott
1869
James Prescott
1868
James Prescott
Jonathan Batchelder
1867
Jonathan Batchelder
1866
Jonathan Batchelder
1865
John Law
1864
John Law
1863
John S. French
1862
John S. French
Isaac Morrison
1861
Isaac Morrison
Joseph J. Mills

Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana secede (Jan.). Confederate States of America is established (Feb. 8). Jefferson Davis is elected president of the Confederacy (Feb. 9). Texas secedes (March 2). Abraham Lincoln is inaugurated as the 16th president (March 4).

(1861-1865) Civil War: Conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederacy) over the expansion of slavery into western states. Confederates attack Ft. Sumter in Charleston, S.C., marking the start of the war (April 12, 1861). Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee secede (April–June). Emancipation Proclamation is issued, freeing slaves in the Confederate states (Jan. 1, 1863). Battle of Gettysburg is fought (July 1–3). President Lincoln delivers the Gettysburg Address (Nov. 19). Gen. William T. Sherman captures Atlanta (Sept. 2, 1864). Lincoln's second inauguration (March 4, 1865). Gen. Ulysses S. Grant captures Richmond, Va., the capital of the Confederacy (April 3). Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrenders to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse, Va., (April 9).









1860
Joseph J. Mills

Abraham Lincoln is elected president (Nov. 6). South Carolina secedes from the Union (Dec. 20).
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1859
Joseph J. Mills
1858
Joseph J. Mills
1857
Joseph J. Mills
1856
Edmund Rand
1855
Joseph J. Mills
1854
Edmund Rand
1853
Edmund Rand
1852
Edmund Rand
1851
Edmund Rand
1850
Edmund Rand
1849
Edmund Rand
1848
Edmund Rand
1847
Edmund Rand
1846
Edmund Rand
1845
Edmund Rand
1844
Edmund Rand
1843
Edmund Rand
1842
Edmund Rand

The New Hampshire Asylum for the Insane (now the New Hampshire State Hospital ) opened its first building for the reception of patients
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1841
Edmund Rand
1840
Edmund Rand
1839
Edmund Rand
1838
Edmund Rand
1837
Edmund Rand
1836
Benjamin Stevens

Texas declares its independence from Mexico (March 1). Texan defenders of the Alamo are all killed during siege by the Mexican Army (Feb. 24–March 6). Texans defeat Mexicans at San Jacinto (April 21).
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1835
Benjamin Stevens
1834
Benjamin Stevens
1833
Benjamin Stevens
1832
Benjamin Stevens
1831
Benjamin Stevens
1830
Benjamin Stevens
1829
Benjamin Stevens
1828
Benjamin Stevens
1827
Benjamin Stevens
1826
Benjamin Stevens
1825
Benjamin Stevens
Nathaniel Weare
1824
Nathaniel Weare
1823
Nathaniel Weare
1822
Nathaniel Weare
1821
Nathaniel Weare
1820
Nathaniel Weare
1819
Nathaniel Weare
1818
Nathaniel Weare
1817
Nathaniel Weare
1816
Nathaniel Weare

The new State House erected in Concord from local granite between 1816 and 1819 was the largest and most ambitious single structure yet built in New Hampshire

statehouse.jpg
1815
Nathaniel Weare
1814
Nathaniel Weare
1813
Nathaniel Weare
1812
Nathaniel Weare
1811
Nathaniel Weare
1810
Nathaniel Weare

The construction of the first state prison from local granite gave the granite industries of both Concord and New Hampshire their start

state prison.jpg
1809
Nathaniel Weare
1808
Nathaniel Weare
1807
Nathaniel Weare
1806
Nathaniel Weare
1805
Nathaniel Weare

Men at work surveying for a road through Franconia Notch were the first Europeans to note the rock formation called the Old Man of the Mountain
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1804
Nathaniel Weare

Lewis and Clark set out from St. Louis, Mo., on expedition to explore the West and find a route to the Pacific Ocean. (May 14).

1803
Nathaniel Weare
1802
Nathaniel Weare
1801
Nathaniel Weare
1800
Nathaniel Weare
1799
Nathaniel Weare
1798
Nathaniel Weare
1797
Nathaniel Weare

John Adamsis inaugurated as the second president in Philadelphia (March 4).
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1796
Nathaniel Weare

The first aerial ascension in the state took place when the French inventor Jean-Pierrre Blanchard demonstrated his hydrogen balloon and parachute in Portsmouth
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1795
Nathaniel Weare
1794
Jeremiah Eastman
1793
Jeremiah Eastman
1792
Jeremiah Eastman
1791
Jeremiah Eastman
1790
Jeremiah Eastman
1789
Jeremiah Eastman

George Washington is unanimously elected president of the United States in a vote by state electors (Feb. 4). U.S. Constitution goes into effect, having been ratified by nine states (March 4). U.S. Congress (Web:clerkweb.house.gov/histrecs/househis/lists/sessions.htm) meets for the first time at Federal Hall in New York City (March 4). Washington is inaugurated as president at Federal Hall in New York City (April 30).
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1788
Jeremiah Eastman
1787
Jeremiah Eastman
1786
Jeremiah Eastman
1785
Jeremiah Eastman
1784
Jeremiah Eastman
1783
Jeremiah Eastman
1782
Jeremiah Eastman
1781
Jeremiah Eastman
1780
Jeremiah Eastman
1779
Jeremiah Eastman
1778
Jeremiah Eastman
1777
Jeremiah Eastman
1776
Jeremiah Eastman
1775
Jeremiah Eastman
1774
Jeremiah Eastman
1773
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1772
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1771
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1770
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1769
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1768
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1767
Thomas Simpson, Esq.
1766
Thomas Simpson, Esq.

History of the NH Town Clerk

The office of town clerk can be traced back in its origin to the first settlements in the State, which were made under proprietary land grants in the Province of New Hampshire.  

Proprietors of the early settlements in New Hampshire elected clerks to keep a record of proprietary proceedings.  In some towns, however, the predecessor of the clerk seems to have been the secretary of the court or body of freemen.  

During the period of the New England Dominion, when government was centralized in Boston, town clerks were appointed by judicial authorities; but in 1699, the second provincial period, it was enacted that the office was to be elective in each town.  By 1804, it was stated that the clerk should be elected by ballot, as it is at present.  

Among the early duties of the town clerk was the task of recording births and burials.  In 1693 an act was passed stating that “…the Clark (is) to returne Every quarter of a yeare, a List of all Marrages Bearthes & Burialls unto the Register Appointed for the Province…”  By 1849 the duties of receiving vital statistics were clearly outlined, and the clerk was required to make annual reports of these statistics to the Secretary of State.  

Early acts which regulated voting entrusted several duties to the town clerk.  The duty of recording votes was given him with certain specific regulations.  He was required to record the minutes of the town meetings, including therein a copy of the warrant and all votes cast for and against any articles in it.  He was also required to administer the oaths of office and of allegiance and to record the names of all persons sworn into any town office.  The New Hampshire Constitution of 1784 required votes for state and national officers be recorded by him, and he was made responsible for recording votes for county offices as well.  

By 1800 the town clerk was required to maintain records of selectmen’s assessments and invoices, the sale of land for taxes, attachments, liens, and mortgages.  Since 1754 he has been required to draw the names of jurors. (Note: jury selection is no longer conducted by city or town clerks.) Other miscellaneous duties include licensing and acting as secretary between the town and various state officials.  

Today…the major duties of the clerk include caring for the town records, recording vital statistics, issuing permits and licenses, and acting as an election official.  Other duties include writing reports, administering oaths, and furnishing information to townspeople and to other local and state officials.  

[Source: The Town Clerk in New Hampshire. University of NH: Durham. August, 1958.]

Early Beginnings


The Municipal Clerk is the oldest of public servants in local government, along with the tax collector.  The profession traces back before Biblical times.  For example, the modern Hebrew translation of Town Clerk is “Mazkir Ha’ir” which literally translated, means city or town Reminder: “The early keepers of archives were often called Remembrancers:” and before writing came into use, their memory served as the public record.

Ancient Greece had a city secretary who read official documents publicly.  At the opening of a meeting, one of his first duties was to decree a curse upon anyone who should seek to deceive the people.

St. Paul and his followers during his missionary work in Persia (now Western Turkey), owed their safety to the action of a town clerk.  As related in Acts 19:22-41, written in 58 AD, the artisans of Ephesus who made the idols of the time, feared the effect of Paul’s missionary work on their trade.  They incited a mob to seize two of Paul’s followers.  The town clerk, however, spoke out against this action and insisted that charges laid against these men had to be settled in the proper manner and before the proper authorities.  There was no justification for riotous conduct.  With that, he dispersed the crowd.

Reportedly, the regency line of France descends from the office of the Clerk!  According to James Bryce in his book, “The Holy Roman Empire,” there is a direct link between the position of Mayor of the palace, a clerical post created by the Merovingian Kings of France, and all subsequent Kings of France.

In the eighth century, the Frankish Kings of France depended on the Mayor of the Palace to perform all manner of clerical and administrative tasks for the King including collecting taxes and fees, publishing documents, keeping state records and assisting in the enforcement of the King’s justice.

In 751, the Merovingian King, Childeric, was deposed and his assistant, Pippin, the mayor of the Palace, became not only the monarch of France but was simultaneously created a patrician of Rome by Pope Gregory the Third.  Pippin was, in turn, father of the great Charlemagne, the first Holy Roman Emperor and founder of the Carolingian Dynasty of Europe on High, which in successive generations, produced the Kings of France, as well as the Emperors of Germany and Austria.


Development in England

The title “Clerk” as we know it developed from the Latin clericus.  During the Middle Ages, when scholarship and writing were limited to the clergy, clerk came to mean a scholar, especially one who could read, write, and thus serve as notary, secretary, accountant and recorder.

In ancient England, the township (surrounded by its hedge or “tun”) and the borough (and outpost fortified with a wall) developed a strong system of democratic local government.  And one of the first officials these freemen elected was the “Clarke.”

The beginning of the office of city clerk in England can be traced back to 1272 AD in the history of the Corporation of Old London.  The “Remembrancer” was called upon to remind the councilors (members of the council) what had transpired at their previous meetings, since the meeting of the early councils were not recorded in written minutes.

In 1354, the Mayor of Nottingham appointed the Clarke and provided for his remuneration.  In 1439, Symkyn Birches was awarded the office of “Toun Clerk” in another community for the rest of his life.  In 1477, Thomas Carton, a town Clerk, was the first English printer, and served as diplomat for the King.  In 1485, Nicholas Lancaster, the Clarke, became Mayor of York.

In the 1500’s in England, there were not only the “Town Clarke” but also the “Clerc Comptroller of the King’s Honorable Household”.  In 1603, there was a “Clarke General of the Armie.”  Indeed, King Henry the Eighth had a “Clarke of the Spicery” and King Charles had his “Clarke of the Robes.”

Perhaps the strongest statement of the unique position occupied by the Municipal Clerk is by and English court in the Middle Ages ruling in the case, Hurle-Hobbs ex parte Riley and another.  Concerning this case, Chief Justice Lord Caldecote, observed:
        
“The office of town clerk is an important part of the machinery of local government.  He may be said to stand between the local Council and the ratepayers.  He is there to assist by his advice and action, the conduct of public affairs in the borough and, if there is a disposition on the part of the council, still more on the part of any member of the council, to ride roughshod over his opinions, the question must at once arise as to whether it is not his duty forthwith to resign his office or, at any rate, to do what he thinks right and await the consequences.”


Colonial Development

When the early colonists came to America they set up forms of local government to which they had been accustomed, and the office of the clerk was one of the first to be established.  When the colonists first settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts, they quickly appointed a person to act as recorder.  That person kept all the vital records for birth, marriages and deaths for the church, as well as various other records of appointments, deeds, meetings, and the election of offices at the annual town meeting.

Indeed, in Massachusetts, the town clerk was one of the earliest offices established in colonial towns.  The settlers were well aware of the importance of keeping accurate written records of their agreements and actions including grants of land, regulations governing animals, the collection of taxes and the expenditure of town funds.

The person given the responsibility for recording these orders was also often given other duties, such as sweeping the meeting-house and selling the seats, ringing the bell, and paying the bounty for jays and blackbirds whose heads were presented to him by the citizens.  By the middle of the 17th century, the title town clerk appears in town records and this title has continued to the present.

One of the earliest statutory duties imposed by the Massachusetts General Court on town clerks was recording births, deaths and marriages.  Since that time, the General Court has formalized by statute many of the duties first delegated by vote of the town and has added others.  By 1692, the town clerk as required to enter and record divisions of land and orders of the selectmen as well as all town votes, orders and grants.  Warrants directed to the constable for the collection of taxes were to be signed by the assessors or the town clerk.  Between 1742 and 1756, the General Court made the town clerk responsible for maintaining a list showing each inhabitant’s property value and for producing it, if necessary, to substantiate a person’s voting rights.  The town clerk was empowered to call town meetings to elect selectmen if a majority of the selectmen had moved from the town or were absent in the service of the country.

The office of town clerk of Wethersfield, Connecticut, was established inn 1639 and that person was to “keep a record of every man’s house and land,” and to present “a fairly written” copy of such to every General Court to be recorded by the secretary of the colony.  In the first municipal election in New York City in 1689, the offices of Sheriff, Mayor and City Clerk were on the ballot.

The Puritan town of Woodstock, Massachusetts appointed a town clerk in 1693 to record deeds and mortgages and to record the books.  Because the town’s people wanted to keep him on a permanent basis, he was given 20 acres of land and a fee of 12 pence for each town meeting plus 6 pence for each grant filed. The Town Clerk of Middleboro, Massachusetts, on the other hand, was compensated with “one load of fish taken at the herring-weir and delivered to his house.”  Three centuries later, one of his seventh great grandchildren is serving as City Recorder of the city of Newport, Oregon.

Source:  International Institute of Municipal Clerks
            Rev. 8/98